Why Tablets Are Important for Educating Our Children

Posted by Diana Ayling on November 13, 2012 at 9:13

The other night I was at an information evening at my children’s school here in Melbourne, Australia. The evening was being held by the senior primary teachers and the school principal to discuss their research into running a 1:1 iPad program for the Grade 5 and 6 students next year (that is roughly ages 11 and 12 here in Australia). I’d been asked to say a few words, as a parent, but also as someone the principal knew worked primarily in and around education technology. I am a fan of technology in education, but definitely not a techevangelist; he wanted me to talk about the potential. I said I would, but I also wanted to talk about the dangers. As it turned out – I spoke about neither.  Read more...

Find out what makes the Professor of the year tick

Posted by Diana Ayling on November 19, 2012 at 12:32

You may be interested in the philosophy and approach of the Carnegie Foundation Professor of the Year Dr Christy Price. What do you think makes her stand out? Read more...

Learn at home and consolidate your learning in class.

Posted by Diana Ayling on November 19, 2012 at 13:30View Blog
This is a 10 minute walk through the latest developments in Flipped Learning. This is using technology to enhance traditional learning. Read more....

Are you worried about Web 2.0?
This is a fun look at Web 2.0 from a teacher's perspective.
A few useful resources for online learning, teaching and assessment
As eLearning and Moodle roll out around Unitec, staff are regularly asking us for advice on the pedagogy around eLearning initiatives. What are the pro's and con's of making the big switch to embracing Moodle? Rather than proselytise, I think it is useful to look at what some of the major tertiary institutions think and do in this area, particularly Australian institutions.
Getting started with Google applications
Many teachers want a simple introduction to using online applications. In this self study unit you are introduced to five Google applications.
Why is digital citizenship important?
Digizen.org is an organisation that is all about building safe spaces and communities, understanding how to manage personal information, and about being internet savvy - using your online presence to grow and shape your world in a safe, creative way, and inspiring others to do the same. 

Digizen has identified a number of activities students and staff will be engaged in online. Our challlenge as teachers is to be able to undertake these activities safely and appropriately, and teach our students to do the same.
What is cloud computing
Cloud Computing allows web workers to share and collaborate online. Fine our more about Cloud Computing for you and your students.
Guide to Moodle for Teachers
A resource available to Unitec staff ONLY.
 Does your online blog, website, Moodle or Blackboard site suffer from a 6 month itch?
In other words if it is hard to sustain enthusiasm and effort after 6 months. You are not the only person. Here the ProBlogger gives some good tips for all of us responsible for an online presence. To check it out ClickHERE.
More on the elearning strategy
We realise this can be quite a challenge as there are a range of requirements within a programme of study. So we have devised something to get you started. A simple guide for students that could be adapted programme by programme and given to students prior to enrolment. Students would be encouraged to set themselves up for success before their study programme started. 

We would really like your feedback on this guide, so if you have any suggestions to improve it please share by adding a comment.

10 Technology Tips for Students

 

Last updated by Diana Ayling Dec 11, 2012.

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